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13. Almost looking like a snow-covered mountain vista, bare blackened stems and trunks rise up from mountain ridges white with ash stretch out of sight with just a small grouping of trees in the center right whose upper canopies managed to survive the fire, by Ian Bornarth

California Climate Bond

With increasingly severe fires, floods, and sea level rise affecting the state each year, California should be rapidly investing to deploy climate mitigation measures and strengthen its resiliency as soon as possible. Ask your legislators to act on a climate bond in 2024.

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foggy mountains behind mature trees, by Mike Kahn

America the Beautiful

The vision for protecting and restoring 30% of America’s land and waters by 2030 has a ways to go. Urge state leadership to prioritize conserving and restoring lands, waters, and wildlife.

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Mushrooms of different sizes, shapes, and colors found at San Vicente Redwoods lie on a white sheet for mycologist Maya Elson to identify, by Orenda Randuch

Fungi of the Forest: Meet the Mushrooms of San Vicente Redwoods

Mycologist and researcher Maya Elson teamed up with photographer Orenda Randuch for a fungi photo essay to help us meet the mushrooms hard at work at San Vicente Redwoods. Learn identification tips to recognize mushrooms above ground, and their critical work underground to help the forest recover from fire, drought, flood, and human impacts in the fight against climate change.

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Looking up a sun-dappled, lush forested slope covered in redwoods, ferns, and mosses at Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park, by Orenda Randuch

2023 News: What You’ve Made Possible

Without supporters like you, fewer forests would be protected and habitats restored, and they would be less resilient to fires, floods, and the increasing threats from our changing climate. You have made so many amazing things happen this year for redwood forests, and the people, plants, and creatures that need them. Thank you for protecting forests that help protect us all! Here are a few of the moments you made possible in 2023.

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Fuel for Fire: Framing Forest Resilience Three Years After the CZU Fire

Three years after the CZU Fire, the resilient land is recovering and fire-adapted species are restoring green to the landscape. But these lush signs of nature’s rebirth after fire can quickly become fuel for the next fire. How can we restore these ecosystems from a damaging past for an uncertain future? Take a look through a trained lens to witness the intersection of natural resilience and cutting-edge stewardship techniques.

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Lupine blossoms, deep royal blue on the bottom and white on top, amidst spring green grasses, fill the frame, by Orenda Randuch

Beyond the Bloom: Superblooms in the Santa Cruz Mountains

Our resident biologist and natural resource manager Beatrix Jiménez-Helsley takes us on a photo essay into the rarer side of the superbloom and why its waning in some habitats and just getting started in others—a phenomenon that just may be the saving grace for redwoods and the species that rely on them as our climate continues to change.

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Redwoods and Climate Part 4

In the final part of the redwoods and climate series by Julia Busiek, we explore research about how climate change is already affecting redwoods across their range, and how it informs our new plan to save redwoods, and the plants and wildlife that rely on them, before its too late.

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Looking up from the burled base of an old-growth redwood trunk the plate-like bark stretches up to a reiterated trunk stemming off and growing up toward the green canopy above where the sun shines through younger trees rising up to meet the blue sky, by Canopy Dynamics

Ancient Trees in a Modern World

Can thinking of redwoods differently help us give care to young things that might grow old in the face of climate change before it’s too late? Thanks to historian and author Jared Farmer, we are expanding our vocabulary for describing and understanding what he calls “Elderflora,” which is also the title of his new book that trace’s ancient plant life’s intersection with our modern human world.

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A rough barked trunk of a redwood tree looms large rising up from the lower left to the sky textured by the leafy canopy of the surrounding forest cast golden orange and dark green tones

Earth Month of Action

As we grapple with a changing climate, the need to take action for the 52nd Earth Day on April 22 feels more urgent than ever. We have put together a calendar of 30 actions—from planting a native garden to experiencing forest bathing—you can take throughout the month to protect the natural world close to you. Learn about this week’s actions to help make a bigger impact together!

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Thin white threads of mycelium cross, tangle, and create a web woven through dark soil, photo by Kirill Ignatyev

A Tangled Web: Redwoods, Colonialism, Eugenics, and Climate Change

Many people may not realize when walking among redwood forests that their conservation is tied up in a natural and social history that is as complex as the trees are visually spectacular. It is precisely the traits that give the redwoods their splendor that led to one particularly nefarious argument for their conservation—the then-emerging field of eugenics. Read on to learn more about how eugenics is entangled with the history of redwoods conservation.

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